Monthly Archives: December 2015

A Major Update to refine_viaf

I’ve rewritten my refine_viaf project in Java. It’s what refine.codefork.com is now running. The old python code is considered deprecated and will no longer be maintained, but will remain available in the python-deprecated branch on github.

The only thing most users need to know is that refine_viaf should return better results now. For the curious, this post explains the subtle but important differences in the new version and some reasons for the rewrite.

Differences

In a nutshell, the main difference/improvement is that searches now behave more like the VIAF website.

This is due mainly to how sources (i.e. “LC” for Library of Congress) are handled. Previously, either the source specified on the URL or the “preferred source” from the config file was used to filter out search results, but it did NOT get passed into the actual VIAF search query. This could give you some weird results. The new version works like VIAF’s website: if you don’t specify a source, everything gets searched; if you do specify one, it DOES get passed to the VIAF search query. Simple.

The old version had weird rules for which name in each VIAF “cluster” result it actually displayed. In the new version, if you don’t specify a source, the most popular name (ie. the name used by the most sources) for a search result is used for display. If you specify a source, then its name is always used.

The old version supported a comma-separated list of sources at the end of the URL path. In the new version, only a single source is supported, since that’s what VIAF’s API accepts.

Lastly, the licenses are different: the python version was distributed under a BSD license. The new version is GNU GPL.

Other reasons for the rewrite

The changes above could have been implemented in python. I decided to rewrite it in Java for a few reasons:

– Overall performance is better in Java. The Django app used BeautifulSoup because VIAF’s XML used to be janky, but it appears this is no longer the case; Java’s SAX parser works great with their XML these days and is very fast. BeautifulSoup would leak memory and consume a lot of CPU, to the point where it would trigger automated warnings from my VPS provider. My server is very modest and needs to run other things, so these were real problems. Running the service as a single multi-threaded Java process keeps memory usage low and predictable, and it never spikes the CPU.

– Running a Java jar file is MUCH easier for people who want to run their own service, especially on Windows. With the python version, you had to install pip, install a bunch of packages, and create and configure a Django app, all of which put the software out of reach of many users who might want to run it.

– I don’t care what other people think: I like Java. Plus I wanted to experiment with Spring Boot. There are much leaner web frameworks I could have used to save some memory, but it was interesting to play with Spring.

Leave a comment!

If you use this thing, please take a second and leave a comment on this post. I’m interested to know how many people really run this on their own computers.

Enjoy.